Tax Exemption Hearing Held On Status Of Former King Property

By Leah Williams

Several community expressed concern at a hearing that was held by the Washington County Board of Review on Tuesday, May 21, over an application that would exempt from tax revenue.

Community Link was gifted the $750,000 King Property in the Windswept Acres subdivision last May for the use of becoming a group home for developmentally disabled adults. The hearing is an automatic process if an application for exemption is filed for a property valued at more than $100,000.

“Our job is to have this public hearing,” Supervisor of Assessments Sharon Mewes said.

Jerry King reportedly told his family three days before his death that he wanted his home to be given to a not-for-profit. He and his wife Marilyn, who preceded him in death, had lived in Nashville since 1966.

One of King’s daughters, Leslie Pedtke, is a board member of Community Link, which is based in Breese. The family agreed to donate the home to be used as a Community Integrated Living Arrangement home.

In a letter read to the board of review, David Erlinger stated that he does not think it would be a wise decision considering  this time of extremely tight budgets and strapped local governments. It would also be a compounded loss over time.

“The residents of Beaucoup township need every dollar available to provide needed services,” Erlinger said in the letter.

Nancy Hisch said she believes that the individual needs of the potential residents should also be considered. The rural area does not have any sidewalks and it is not accessible to the main roadways.

“I am more concerned about the things that could happen and I’m very aware of what could happen, Hisch said. “You could have one person outside.”

Audrey Finke, who worked in the healthcare industry, also rose objections over the exemption application, noting that rules and regulations should be in place to ensure safety and staffing requirements to make sure the residents are attended and not able to wander the area and neighboring area unsupervised.

“I am concerned about what could happen because I know what could happen,” she said.

Jim Schomaker said

“It seems like a loss-loss for Washington County,” Schomaker said.

The decision is now in the hands of the Illinois Department of Revenue, and Haake said it may be early June when the board receives confirmation of its decision.

Interim Executive Director Barb Nelson answered the concerns, stating that the on-site staff will be available to address the individual needs of the five residents who would be approved to be there. She also said part of the services include transporting them into town if they should desire.

“We want to make sure that all of our residents that we are supporting inside our resident homes are going to be good neighbors that they are going to be good for the community,” Nelson said. “And our staff is there to help them do that.”

Board Chairman Marvin Haake said after the King property brought in a significant amount of tax revenue county for a dozen local taxing bodies. The amount totaled approximately $30,000 in revenue, according to documents from the supervisor of assessments office.

“They will make up the shortfall by targeting to the rest of us,” Haake said. “Folks, you are going to end up picking it up.”

Mewes said that should the state decided to grant the exemption status, there would need to be five houses valued at $200,000 or more to be built in the area to make up the revenue difference.

Haake said it could be early June before the board of review is notified of the state department’s decision.

By Leah Williams

Several community expressed concern at a hearing that was held by the Washington County Board of Review on Tuesday, May 21, over an application that would exempt from tax revenue.

Community Link was gifted the $750,000 King Property in the Windswept Acres subdivision last May for the use of becoming a group home for developmentally disabled adults. The hearing is an automatic process if an application for exemption is filed for a property valued at more than $100,000.

“Our job is to have this public hearing,” Supervisor of Assessments Sharon Mewes said.

Jerry King reportedly told his family three days before his death that he wanted his home to be given to a not-for-profit. He and his wife Marilyn, who preceded him in death, had lived in Nashville since 1966.

One of King’s daughters, Leslie Pedtke, is a board member of Community Link, which is based in Breese. The family agreed to donate the home to be used as a Community Integrated Living Arrangement home.

In a letter read to the board of review, David Erlinger stated that he does not think it would be a wise decision considering  this time of extremely tight budgets and strapped local governments. It would also be a compounded loss over time.

“The residents of Beaucoup township need every dollar available to provide needed services,” Erlinger said in the letter.

Nancy Hisch said she believes that the individual needs of the potential residents should also be considered. The rural area does not have any sidewalks and it is not accessible to the main roadways.

“I am more concerned about the things that could happen and I’m very aware of what could happen, Hisch said. “You could have one person outside.”

Audrey Finke, who worked in the healthcare industry, also rose objections over the exemption application, noting that rules and regulations should be in place to ensure safety and staffing requirements to make sure the residents are attended and not able to wander the area and neighboring area unsupervised.

“I am concerned about what could happen because I know what could happen,” she said.

Jim Schomaker said he believes that the loss of tax revenue could be detrimental for the area.

“It seems like a loss-loss for Washington County,” Schomaker said.

The decision is now in the hands of the Illinois Department of Revenue, and Haake said it may be early June when the board receives confirmation of its decision.

Interim Executive Director Barb Nelson answered the concerns, stating that the on-site staff will be available to address the individual needs of the five residents who would be approved to be there. She also said part of the services include transporting them into town if they should desire.

“We want to make sure that all of our residents that we are supporting inside our resident homes are going to be good neighbors that they are going to be good for the community,” Nelson said. “And our staff is there to help them do that.”

Board Chairman Marvin Haake said after the King property brought in a significant amount of tax revenue county for a dozen local taxing bodies. The amount totaled approximately $30,000 in revenue, according to documents from the supervisor of assessments office.

“They will make up the shortfall by targeting to the rest of us,” Haake said. “Folks, you are going to end up picking it up.”

Mewes said that should the state decided to grant the exemption status, there would need to be five houses valued at $200,000 or more to be built in the area to make up the revenue difference.

Haake said it could be early June before the board of review is notified of the state department’s decision.

1 Comment

  1. Jack Handey© on June 1, 2019 at 12:32 am

    Your property is never your property. If you build it the government will always be camped outside your door demanding their cut and complaining, even though you pay them to stay out of jail, its not regulation. When you spend the money to bring it to their regulation they raise your fee to stay out of jail and maybe suck a building permit fee out of you also. Hey at least if its litigated it will be in the ridiculous 6+ million dollar courthouse we didn’t need! Its rarely a revenue issue its spending OPM for our own good because we are thinking impaired. 30K in property tax for any house is ridiculous, but you need it when you have 10-15 million in enforcement buildings. If nothing changes in 20 years I will have paid our overlords the equivalent of what my parents built the house for in 1958, in the end, an 80 year old house. What a bargain a bargain fo me. Wonder if we can sell the front porch of the old “historical” court house that should have never been built since its “historical”. Maybe even sell the building and soak some private owner for 60k in property taxes! If you’re a vampire don’t run with wooden stakes©! The five 200k houses they need now will be 8-10 in 10 years if they don’t pillage your property again in that time (and they will) they will still need more. We will need a new 10-20 million dollar edifice to eduKatiion that obviously doesn’t work correctly as the publiK is unconcerned/overjoyed when the firetrucks and police escort school buses at whatever cost that is to them. It ain’t free. In the end a person tries to do a decent thing and the vultures circle. If our county is going to be destitute over 30k you are doomed anyway. We have 353,903 acres of farmland if you excised .10c per acre there’s the devastating shortfall lol.

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